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How much does automobile insurance cost?

According to a Forbes Advisor survey of premiums from major auto insurance providers, car insurance costs $2,067 on average per year. That works out to $172 monthly on average.

Factors Affecting the Price of Auto Insurance

  • Your record as a driver
  • Your age and driving experience in years
  • Your residence
  • Choices for auto insurance coverage
  • Deductible (if collision and comprehensive coverage are purchased)
  • Vehicle type
  • Yours driving record, including any gaps in coverage or continuous coverage
  • Your insurance rating based on credit

What Kinds of Auto Insurance Are Necessary?

One of the most common types of auto insurance is liability insurance, which is needed in almost all states.  In the event of a car accident, your liability insurance will cover any injuries and property damage you unintentionally cause to others.

Another sort of auto insurance that is mandated in many areas is uninsured motorist coverage. This insurance will cover your and your passengers’ medical expenses if you are struck by an uninsured driver. Although you will utilize your own personal injury protection (PIP) for the medical costs of you and your passengers, regardless of who was at fault for the accident, in jurisdictions with “no-fault” car insurance systems.

If you financed your automobiles, collision and comprehensive insurance is probably necessary for your auto loan. It makes sense to get various kinds of auto insurance even if you don’t have a car loan, especially for newer vehicles.  No matter who is at fault, collision insurance pays for automotive accidents involving other vehicles or objects like buildings, poles or etc. Car theft, fires, weather-related damage, flooding, hail, falling items, vandalism, and collisions with animals are all covered by comprehensive auto insurance.

Summary of Automobile Accidents in the U.S.

The number of fatal car accidents is rising nationwide. Over 39,500 fatal car accidents happened on American roadways in 2021, a 10% rise from 2020. You run a higher risk when you get behind the wheel in some states where reckless driving is more prevalent. Which state, though, has the worst drivers?

Forbes Advisor evaluated all 50 states and Washington, D.C., based on six important parameters to find out. The data shows which states have the worst drivers and sheds light on the many types of risky driving behavior that are prevalent in each one.

The Worst Drivers in the Top 5 States

  1. Texas: Score for Texas: 100 out of 100

For two of the metrics researchers took into account, Texas comes in second worst in the country: fatal car accidents involving drowsy drivers (1.35 accidents per 100,000 licensed drivers) and fatal car accidents involving drivers who were travelling the wrong way on a one-way street or on the wrong side of the road (1.53 accidents per 100,000 licensed drivers).

The third-highest rate of drunk drivers involved in fatal accidents is reported from Texas (17.24 per 100,000 licensed drivers).

With 1.92 fatal crashes per 100,000 licensed drivers, Texas has the ninth-highest rate of distracted driving-related automobile accidents.

  1. Louisiana: Louisiana received a score of 89.32/100.

The number of fatal vehicle accidents involving a distracted driver in Louisiana is the third highest (3.74 accidents per 100,000 licensed drivers), and the number of fatal collisions involving intoxicated drivers is the eighth highest (13.44 per 100,000 licensed drivers).

With 0.9 accidents for per 100,000 licensed drivers, Louisiana has the tenth highest rate of fatal car accidents involving drowsy drivers.

  1. Kansas: Kansas received a score of 84.79/100.

Kansas has 4.46 fatal auto accidents for per 100,000 licensed drivers, which is the second-highest rate in the nation. The state has the third-highest rate of fatal car accidents (1.47 accidents per 100,000 licensed drivers), involving a driver who disregarded traffic signs, traffic signals, or a traffic enforcer.

Kansas is the fifth worst state for fatal car accidents involving a driver who was driving the wrong way on a one-way street or on the wrong side of the road (1.42 accidents per 100,000 licensed drivers) and the fourth worst state for fatal car accidents involving a drowsy driver (1.28 accidents per 100,000 licensed drivers).

  1. Oklahoma: Score for Oklahoma: 80.53 out of 100

With 2.02 accidents per 100,000 licensed drivers, Oklahoma has the seventh-highest rate of fatal auto accidents involving distracted driving.

Oklahoma has the eighth-highest rate of fatal car accidents (1.27 accidents per 100,000 licensed drivers), involving a driver who disobeyed traffic signs or a traffic enforcer.

The state has the ninth-highest rate of drunk drivers involved in fatal collisions (13.02 drunk drivers per 100,000 licensed drivers).

  1. Kentucky: Kentucky received a score of 78.96/100

At 3.37 incidents per 100,000 licensed drivers, Kentucky has the fourth-highest rate of fatal auto accidents involving distracted drivers.

In terms of fatal car accidents involving drowsy drivers, Kentucky ranks seventh (0.93 fatal accidents per 100,000 licensed drivers).

Additionally, the state had 0.74 fatal car accidents per 100,000 licensed drivers—the tenth highest rate—involving drivers who were travelling the wrong way down a one-way street or on the other side of the road.

Main Points

  • The worst drivers nationwide are found in Texas, while the greatest are found in Washington, D.C.
  • The South is home to five of the top ten worst states for driving, including Texas, Louisiana, Oklahoma, Kentucky, and South Carolina.
  • The East Coast region has seven of the top ten states with the finest drivers, including Washington, D.C., Vermont, Massachusetts, Connecticut, New Hampshire, New York, and Rhode Island.
  • The highest percentage of inebriated drivers engaged in fatal auto accidents occurs in Montana (19.01 per 100,000 licensed drivers), whereas the highest percentage of fatal accidents involving inattentive drivers occurs in New Mexico (9.54 per 100,000 licensed drivers).
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